Posts Tagged ‘Shepherd’

Scairdycats…

Posted: August 20, 2013 in Uncategorized
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35 On that day, when evening had come, he said to them, “Let us go across to the other side.” 36And leaving the crowd, they took him with them in the boat, just as he was. And other boats were with him. 37And a great windstorm arose, and the waves were breaking into the boat, so that the boat was already filling. 38But he was in the stern, asleep on the cushion. And they woke him and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” 39And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm. 40He said to them,“Why are you so afraid? Have you still no faith?”41And they were filled with great fear and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?”

I’ve been reading the gospel of Mark lately.  You should too.  I love all the kittens.  Like these:

but u sed

You too?!  I know.  Why?  Because, kittens.

Right?  Of course.

Okay.  That’s fun.  But really, there’s no kittens in the gospel of Mark.  I think they’re pretty much limited totally to the gospel of John- because he’s all about Love and stuff.  Mark’s kind of in too big a hurry all the time to be snappin pics of kittens.

But seriously though.  I read this passage this morning and it was like a brand new experience.  I’d read it before of course.  Everyone knows the story about Jesus telling the wind and the sea to simmer down.  Do you ever read the bible, store the data, and totally not really get the point?  Like, you’re take away is… “uh, because…. Jesus?”

But I think this time was different.

We’ve got these “experienced” fishermen out on the lake, going to the other side.  I can’t help but mention that they left at dusk.  You know, when EVERYBODY gets in their boat and shoves off.  Course, maybe it’s not THAT weird, being fishermen and stuff.  But I also noticed that they’ve just had an encounter with “the crowd,” who keeps following them everywhere.  And I can’t help but wonder if they were looking to make a discreet exit under the cover of darkness.  But anyway, there.  I’ve mentioned that.

So, they’re working their way across the lake, and a huge storm comes up, so huge that the size of the waves is such that they are cresting over the top of the boatside.  But meanwhile Jesus, tired from a big day of miracles, and exasperating encounters with dull disciples, is … fast asleep in the bottom of the boat.  Where all that cold water is sloshing around.  Weird.

So, cut to the guys at the oar, and panic abounds.  They decide that they might be in over their heads, and decide they better get the honcho on the case.

And they woke him and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” 39And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm.

He wakes up, and gets right to the business of settling down the storm.  “Peace!”

And there was a great calm. . .

Sounds like a nice night to be on the water.  NOW.  And Jesus turns to his shipmates, and proceeds to rail.

Have you ever asked yourself what he was so upset about?  I just did.

It seems reasonable, doesn’t it?  I mean, big storm, big waves, water in the bottom of the boat.  Middle of the night.  Death.  Yeah, I’d be a little freaked out.  But Jesus doesn’t seem to agree.  I mean, what does he expect?  That since we’re in the boat with Jesus we’re safe?  Nothing bad can happen?

I don’t really think so.

Here’s what I think: I think that Jesus wasn’t rebuking the concern they had for the danger they were in.  They were in legitimate danger.  He rebuked the fear that made them totally freak out.

In John’s gospel, Jesus promises that the world will hate us if we follow him, because it hated him first.  He says that “you will have trouble in the world.” But then he says: “TAKE HEART!  I have conquered the world!”  I think *that* is what was irritating him in the boat.  The disciples were afraid.

* * *

I love the 23rd Psalm.  It’s beautiful and poetic.  It’s tranquil and yet conquering.  But my favorite part slides by almost without being noticed.

23 The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.
    He makes me lie down in green pastures.
He leads me beside still waters.
    He restores my soul.
He leads me in paths of righteousness
for his name’s sake.

Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
I will fear no evil,
for you are with me;
your rod and your staff,
they comfort me.

You prepare a table before me
in the presence of my enemies;
you anoint my head with oil;
my cup overflows.
Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me
all the days of my life,
and I shall dwell in the house of the Lord
forever.

Can you guess which part is my favorite?

    He restores my soul.
He leads me in paths of righteousness
for his name’s sake.

Jesus says earlier in John that he is the good shepherd.  I’m sure that this Psalm of David wasn’t far from his mind, nor the minds of his listeners.  The comfort for me is in the fact that God leads us along paths of righteousness for His name’s sake.  I think Jesus was rebuking the disciples not for responding to the storm- it WAS dangerous.  But they doubted their wellness.  They were panicked.  WHY?  Jesus asks, “where is your FAITH?”  But the object of their faith is God.  The very best shepherd.

And the really good news isn’t that He’s a good shepherd either.  Nope.  It’s that he will always BE OUR good shepherd BECAUSE IT’S HIS REPUTATION THAT’S ON THE LINE.  Not because we’re great sheep.  Even if we are.  And even if we’re not.  But because if he didn’t lead us in paths of righteousness, he wouldn’t BE a good a shepherd, and that’s just not who he is.

Hopefully, next time I’m in a storm, and the waves have my whiskers all wet, I can go to Jesus, and tell him I need him.  And I won’t be scared.  I won’t be, as James says, double-minded, being tossed about this way and that way like a wave on the ocean.  Hmm.  I wonder if James ever went on a three-hour tour with his older brother, the wind-whisperer?

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Genesis 48

11 Israel said to Joseph, “I never expected to see your face again, and now God has allowed me to see your children too.”

15 Then he blessed Joseph and said,
   “May the God before whom my fathers 
  
Abraham and Isaac walked faithfully,

the God who has been my shepherd 
  
all my life to this day,

16 the Angel who has delivered me from all harm 
  
   —may he bless these boys.

May they be called by my name 
  
and the names of my fathers Abraham and Isaac, 
and may they increase greatly 
  
on the earth.”

Genesis is a beginning.  Literally.  Genesis opens with the phrase “In the beginning,” or “At first.”  But as is often the case the beginning is … just the first thing in a series of many things.  So Genesis is a beginning, and it’s a journey- a middle.

We’ve met lots of people- Adam and Eve, Cain, Abel, Seth, Noah, Abram, Sarai, Lot, Lot’s daughters, Isaac, Isaac’s servant, Jacob, Esau, Laban, Rachel, Leah, Rueben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, (and Tamar), Zebulun, Issachar, Dan, Gad, Asher, Naphtali, Joseph and Benjamin.  We’ve met Potipher, the Egyptian Royal captain, and his cougar-wife.  We’ve met a royal baker, and a royal cup-bearer.  Pharaoh himself.  But he’s not the first king- we’ve also met the mysterious Malchizekek.

But we’ve also met somebody else.  Creator God, who speaks and creates, and hovers over unformed things.  Creator God who builds and creates and proliferates LIFE.  God, who walks in the garden in the cool of the afternoon relishing what He finds to be very good.  An all-powerful God who creates a community to spend time with, and enjoy.  An all powerful God who makes us free to love Him back, or … not.

The God who sews garments to cover up something He made good, because of the fear that sin created.  The God who, when disobeyed, rather than retaliate and answer in wrath, promises to set things right, and keeps things from getting any worse.  The angel with the sword flashing back and forth between us and the Garden of Eden.

We meet his presence in angels- messengers.  Messengers who come to break through the barriers and communicate God’s promises, over and over.  Despite rebellion.  Despite disbelief.

And we meet God, a shepherd.

As Israel lays in his bed, he places himself in the role of a sheep- and tells Joseph that God has been his shepherd.

After all the things Israel has experienced, after all the different ways He has experienced God, and God’s presence in his life, this is how he describes God.  A shepherd.

The lasting words of God reverberate in that description: I will be with you.

God is introducing himself to you, right now, today.  Not as somebody who will shepherd you.  But as somebody who always has.  God is a shepherd.  He is guiding you to safe places to lie down.  He is choosing ripe, green grass for you.  He finds a place where you can wade in the water and drink without fear of predators, without fear of drowning.  You may wander out of sight, and get lost, get stuck, get tired.  But he is the Good Shepherd and He will come out, leaving the flock to find you.  You will hear his voice, and call to him, and he will pull you from the mud, pull you from the briar- and return you on his shoulders to where you are safe.

This is the God of Genesis.  He’s a fixer.  He’s a lookout.  He’s a shepherd.